Knitting Help – Norwegian Purling



Norwegian purling is a way to keep the working yarn in back while you’re purling Continental (holding the working yarn in your left hand).

The yarn I use for demonstration is Knit Picks Wool of the Andes Bulky.

The needles I’m using are Knitter’s Pride Bamboo Double Pointed Needles. (No real need to use DPNs for this technique, I’m just using them here because they’re short and they work well on camera.)

My nail polish is by Julep, color “Channon”. http://refer.julep.com/s/stacip

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50 comments for “Knitting Help – Norwegian Purling

  1. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I started continental knitting when I developed hand pain after a project. Continental really helped relieve that, but I COULD NOT GET THE PURL stitch for continental. It just made it equally hard, so I learned the Norwegian Purl and voila. I am also not as tight a knitter in continental. Staci, what a great job describing it. When I first watched it, I thought, "is that the way I do the Norwegian Purl" and then when you did it a bit quicker I realized that yes, it is exactly the way I do it. I use both English and continental for my knitting projects.

  2. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I'm a continental knitter, I just recently got a really good groove for purling in ribbing, having to switch from knits to purls. For all purl rows I hold the working yarn with my thumb, which I find sooo much easier. But I'm definitely excited to try this technique!

  3. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thank you for this video. The angle is perfect!

  4. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    the first movement shouldn't really be a yarn over. if you think of it as an actual yarn over you get the wrong habit and lose time. you should try to think of it as inserting the needle through both the working yarn and the stitch at the same time, that way your brain gets used to a single movement instead of two (yarn over and insert). when done correctly it becomes a very fast way of purling

  5. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    But the end product is the same? I dib’t see an advantage as I don’t have a tension problem..

  6. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Question: I currently knit with my right hand with the yarn coming from the right needle. Can I safely switch to knit with my left hand and have the yarn come from the left needle. Doing this switch in the middle of my sock worries me.

  7. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thanks for the demo, Staci! I am a continental knitter, and it would be great to be able to keep the working yarn behind the needle the whole time, as it might increase speed. I have no problem keeping tension when I purl, as I just flick my left forefinger forward and down to position the yarn so that I can pick it with the right needle and pull it through the stitch on the left needle. The only thing I would worry about with Norwegian purling is that it appears to really stretch out the stitch on the left needle through which the purl stitch is being formed, due to all the needle manipulatio. That stitch seems to be manipulated into a figure 8 when the needles are being moved around! Do you find that this kind of purling makes for loosened stiches on the row below the row that is being worked? Thanks for your reply!

  8. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Staci, Thank you SO much for this clarifying video! I learned about the existence of Norwegian purling from Arne, but your video enabled me to actually do it! I've been looking for a more efficient way to knit beyond my childhood throwing – somehow, this works for me!
    I love ALL your videos! Thanks to you, I've got a wonderful new hobby! You are wonderful!

  9. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Kinda reminds me of cats in a cradle

  10. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thanks for this video. It’s simplified it greatly for me. I’m trying to get used to continental knitting to speed up as I’m used to throwing.

  11. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Phenomenal video! But, sorry, you allways tell us to minimize the moves while knitting (and purling, too!) and now you do so many moves to do one single stitch! Can one be fast purling that style, or is it only a kinda purling for those who can't get familiar with our "normal" purling – methods? Thanks for your answer, it's worth a lot to me!

  12. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    You’re my Goddess! Thank you!!

  13. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    _

  14. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thanks for posting this! I've been doing this a week now and just love it. It was the answer for me as a long-time crocheter, and I don't dread purling anymore.Thanks for the great tutorial.

  15. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thank you so much! I’m a continental knitter and mastered knitting but was having a hard time with the purl stitch and switching between the two in a pattern. After watching your video I’ve got it! It just clicked. ❤️Love all your videos.

  16. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    will you please make a video about russian method? how its done and what it means that the stitches are opposite in comparison to normal continetal knitting, its really hard to follow a pattern 🙁

  17. E B
    October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    This is the best video I have seen on Norwegian purling. Clear on both execution and explanation. I feel like I can totally nail it. The way I’ve been purling so far, I found ALL my stitches twisted😕. Thank you for sharing

  18. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I love your teaching style. You always do a great job of explaining things. I am a continental knitter, and I thought you did just fine. As always, I look forward to your next demonstration.

  19. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I tried this but found the yarn got overstretched. What am I doing wrong?

  20. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Staci, you ROCK ! I am knitting my first pair of socks and have tried Magic Loop but the cord was driving me crazy. I switched to double points and, so far, I prefer the dpn's. I am now looking to try Norwegian style knitting and purling. The knitting is getting easier (with much practice) but the purling has seemed a bit crazy. I searched for a tutorial and there YOU were. Your tutorials have taught me all I know in knitting and I thank you for the many videos you have so graciously shared with all of us. To also find Norwegian purling on your site is incredible.

  21. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    thank you for the tutorial. I am going to try it. continental knitter and always open to new techniques, especially for the dreaded purl stitch.

  22. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Learning how to perfect this stitch in this style has really loosened the tension of my stockinette. I always knew I had a death grip on my needles but didn't like having to consciously relax … now perfecting this technique I can see the difference and feel how much more relaxed the fabric feels afterwards

  23. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I knit continental and this is so great!! I love how you call it a "dance move"

  24. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Similar to the knit stitch when knitting in the Portuguese style.

  25. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thank you so much! I am a continental knitter, and have been for a long time, but I have always felt that my purl method was clunky and I knew there had to be a faster way. This is it! Great tutorial!

  26. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Have you tried Eastern knitting, wrapping the stitches the opposite way and knitting and purling through the back loop? I'd love to see your take on it. Videos demonstrating it seem to be few and far between. I've seen videos demonstrating Eastern purling with the yarn in the front and with the yarn in the back. With the yarn in the back, it's similar to the Norwegian purl, except since one is purling through the back loop and the yarn is already in the back, the dance moves involved are less pronounced. With a little practice Eastern knitting could become my favorite style. I wish there were more videos on it. I got sidetracked with other hobbies and haven't knitted for a while. I'm starting to get back into it. Before I stopped, continental and/or continental combination knitting were my favorite styles. I have trouble picking a favorite style. There are pros and cons to most of them.

  27. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thank you, your tutorial helped me understand it and I'm going to give it a try.

  28. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I like it! Thank you!

  29. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    So

  30. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    This Jenny agrees with the other Jenny, and with Robin's arthritis comment. I love how you went through step by step, needles in H position and so forth. Watching other videos I couldn't see what they were doing but your "H position, down, down, down and through" was crystal clear. Thanks!

  31. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    This is a really good video! I have never tried continental knitting before and have learnt this technique in five minutes! Awesome!

  32. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I finally get it. Thanks! 👍🏻

  33. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    This looks like so much work to me! I just keep the yarn in the back all the time. For purl and knit. I think my style of knitting is eastern European. It's very fast

  34. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I have a lot to learn. I've started and stopped crocheting and knitting several times in my life and am picking it up again. I like this style of stitching but am just not doing something right. Thanks for showing what you do and thanks to all the posters. I learn from all of you and ever so grateful that you are all here. Lynn

  35. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Stitches seemed too loose for me but I like the moves idea.

  36. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Very helpful!

  37. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I usually use this method when ribbing, but use my thumb for full purl rows.

  38. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Staci, you explain things better than anybody else!
    Thank you!

  39. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I just tried this out on a piece of st st… After I figured out what I was doing, I kind of liked it 😉. However, I did find that I had to "reset" after every stitch to get the yarn back behind the needles, etc based on the way everything goes after you pull your stitch off the left needle. So, then I got to thinking… I bet this would be more useful for me (not saying this should be the case for everyone, of course) using it in the kind of scenarios Staci is showing – 2×2 ribbing or something like that, as opposed to st st. I find that my "pinching" technique (As Staci called it; and thank you for that as I wasn't sure if I was the only person on earth who works their yarn and fingers that way when purling… lol!) works best for me with respect to movement and tension. But good stuff because I can see myself using this in certain situations.

    Thanks, as always, Staci! Great video, great job!

    💜~Mel

  40. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I've found that laying the working yarn across the top of my index finger and using my thumb to keep tension works very well.

    Also thank you for doing such a great break down! I've tried several times to figure this style of purling out.

  41. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I've found that laying the working yarn across the top of my index finger and using my thumb to keep tension works very well.

    Also thank you for doing such a great break down! I've tried several times to figure this style of purling out.

  42. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Great video. I am a Continental knitter and always looking for different ways to purl. Will give this a try

  43. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thank you so much for this! I am an accidental continental knitter and always struggled purling. It takes a bit getting used but it feels easier than switching the yarn to the front. Love it!

  44. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thanks for going so slowly. It was so easy to follow you. I think I may be able to do that now.

  45. K C
    October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    You are the best!

  46. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    Thank you. I feel as a crocheter it's more natural to be a continental knitter. I could never purl fast because I found it easier to bring the yarn to the front and use my right hand and drop it during every stitch. I do recommend anyone trying this to use larger than necessary needles and light yarn so you can see where where exactly you're going during the last motion. It makes so much more sense because with smaller needles it's hard to figure out where exactly you're going "down down down down down"

  47. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    YES YES YES!! This changed my life! It's fun to do and now I knit like a ninja. It isn't hard but it is a little bit of a workout. Definitely the highlight of my skill set. Thanks so much for sharing this.

  48. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    This is my new technique for purling! Thank you for this video. I am a continental knitter, and always had an awkward way of purling. I did sort of the pinchy thing that you demonstrated and sort of "threw" my purls. It worked, but was always awkward, and moving the working yarn front to back from knits to purls was even more awkward. Now I don't have to (yay!), and I can see myself knitting much faster using this technique. Thank you Stacey!

  49. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    I'm a crocheter x 18 years that learned to knit in the last year and continental knitting was a smooth transition because I tension with my left hand in crochet. I hold tension by wrapping around my pinky. When purling I use by middle finger to push the yarn down so that the right needle captures the working yarn. Using this method I knit as easily and quickly as I purl.

  50. October 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    This was extremely easy for me to pick up, but I'm finding that my knit stiches on the other side seem twisted. Am I supposed to knit in the back loop after this technique, or did I do something wrong?

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